1975-2000. Democracy and Autonomy: Another Thousand Springtimes…

After Franco’s death (1975), political freedom was re-established in a process that was marked by the approval of the democratic Constitution (1978) and the Statues of Autonomy of the nacionalidades históricas (historic nationalities), the Statute of Galicia being one of them (1980). The Galician Statute confirmed the co-official status of Galician and declared it as Galicia’s own language (lingua propia). A Parliament, Government and the Galician autonomous institutional apparatus were all created and these preferentially used Galician. In 1983, the Galician Law of Linguistic Normalization (Lei de Normalización Linguistica de Galicia) was passed and the Council of Galician Culture (Consello da Cultura Galega) was created in the same year. The Galician Dramatic Centre (Centro Dramático Galego) was founded in 1984 and the first television channel to broadcast solely in Galician was inaugurated (TVG) in 1985, while the language became gradually incorporated into the educational system and the public administration. The three Galician universities (located at Santiago, Vigo and A Coruña) established degrees in Galician Philology, created lecturer posts and centers of Galician studies in various European and American universities.  Furthermore, summer courses in Galician language and culture were also made available to foreigners. Some publishing houses flourished (Edicións Xerais de Galicia), and new multimedia and other means, from comics to the internet (Vieiros), including television series and videos, are nowadays being used to promote and disseminate the language. The civil current for the defense of Galician also organized and mobilized itself (A Mesa pola Normalización Lingüística – The Committee for Linguistic Normalization).


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